A History of Canford in 90 Images

Ninety images in 90 days, as Canford approaches its 90th Anniversary on 15th May, 2013

 

This aerial photograph shows Canford before a big building programme began in the late ‘50s. The tennis courts opposite Magnolia Walk would soon be built upon to create science labs. Art was still taught in the building behind the Fives Courts (top...

This aerial photograph shows Canford before a big building programme began in the late ‘50s. The tennis courts opposite Magnolia Walk would soon be built upon to create science labs. Art was still taught in the building behind the Fives Courts (top centre).

The School Log, a daily chronicle of the life of the school, records the death of King George VI. The log, filled in by a different pupil each term, ran from 1930 to 1978. Entries over the years varied from the dully routine to the interestingly...

The School Log, a daily chronicle of the life of the school, records the death of King George VI. The log, filled in by a different pupil each term, ran from 1930 to 1978. Entries over the years varied from the dully routine to the interestingly quirky.

With the appointment of Antony Brown as Director of Music, many more pupils became involved in making music, both orchestral and choral. When a purpose-built music school was opened in 1974, it would take his name.

With the appointment of Antony Brown as Director of Music, many more pupils became involved in making music, both orchestral and choral. When a purpose-built music school was opened in 1974, it would take his name.

Speech Day saw the dedication of the War Memorial, surrounded by a CCF Guard of Honour. An address was delivered before the flag pole by General Sir Oliver Leese, who said that Canford should be proud of the part played by its Old Boys in the war.

Speech Day saw the dedication of the War Memorial, surrounded by a CCF Guard of Honour. An address was delivered before the flag pole by General Sir Oliver Leese, who said that Canford should be proud of the part played by its Old Boys in the war.

The normal routines of school life – especially the games programmes - were disrupted by an outbreak of poliomyelitis, which fortunately was quickly contained. The photo shows an outdoor chapel service held during the outbreak.

The normal routines of school life – especially the games programmes - were disrupted by an outbreak of poliomyelitis, which fortunately was quickly contained. The photo shows an outdoor chapel service held during the outbreak.

Firemen attend to a burning Mountjoy Oak, an ancient tree with a folklore history to it and a special significance in Canford’s iconography. The oak is central to the school’s crest and is the emblem on the school tie. It survived this fire, but...

Firemen attend to a burning Mountjoy Oak, an ancient tree with a folklore history to it and a special significance in Canford’s iconography. The oak is central to the school’s crest and is the emblem on the school tie. It survived this fire, but sadly would not survive a later one in 1963.

The Rev. Clifford Canning. A much loved man, he had seen Canford through the crises of the war and restored Canford’s numbers to their pre-war level before his retirement in 1947. He had been headmaster for 20 years.

The Rev. Clifford Canning. A much loved man, he had seen Canford through the crises of the war and restored Canford’s numbers to their pre-war level before his retirement in 1947. He had been headmaster for 20 years.

A Memorial Appeal was launched to honour the 139 dead of the war. It would finance the planting of an avenue of chestnut trees, the building of the Memorial Pond on the sunken lawn and a bursary fund to support the education of children of OCs killed...

A Memorial Appeal was launched to honour the 139 dead of the war. It would finance the planting of an avenue of chestnut trees, the building of the Memorial Pond on the sunken lawn and a bursary fund to support the education of children of OCs killed in the war.

During the war the Canfordian, the school magazine, was shrunk to 16 or 24 pages per issue and became coverless. It had no illustrations until a single photo – small and grainy – appeared in the summer issue of 1945. It celebrated Iain Campbell’s...

During the war the Canfordian, the school magazine, was shrunk to 16 or 24 pages per issue and became coverless. It had no illustrations until a single photo – small and grainy – appeared in the summer issue of 1945. It celebrated Iain Campbell’s record-breading innings of 215 against Downside that season.

A drawing of Canford Church by William S. Frevert, a lieutenant with the US army H.Q. Coy, Artillery Observation Regiment. His unit was stationed at Canford before D Day in the summer of 1944.

A drawing of Canford Church by William S. Frevert, a lieutenant with the US army H.Q. Coy, Artillery Observation Regiment. His unit was stationed at Canford before D Day in the summer of 1944.